Tech

An unexpected origin story for a lopsided black hole merger

By Jennifer Chu | MIT News Office A lopsided merger of two black holes may have an oddball origin story, according to a new study by researchers at MIT and elsewhere. The merger was first detected on April 12, 2019 as a gravitational wave that arrived at the detectors of both LIGO (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory), and its Italian counterpart, Virgo. Scientists labeled the signal as GW190412 and determined that it emanated from a clash between two David-and-Goliath black holes, one three times more massive than the other. The…

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Tech

New anode material could lead to safer fast-charging batteries

Scientists at UC San Diego have discovered a new anode material that enables lithium-ion batteries to be safely recharged within minutes for thousands of cycles. Known as a disordered rocksalt, the new anode is made up of earth-abundant lithium, vanadium and oxygen atoms arranged in a similar way as ordinary kitchen table salt, but randomly. It is promising for commercial applications where both high energy density and high power are desired, such as electric cars, vacuum cleaners or drills. The study, jointly led by nanoengineers in the labs of Professors…

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Tech

India bans PUBG, Baidu and more than 100 apps linked to China

A further 118 Chinese mobile apps have been banned by the Indian government, as tensions between the two countries continue to rise. Those on the list include several of Tencent’s products including the hit video game PUBG Mobile and WeChat Work. Previously the government had banned 59 of the most popular apps including TikTok over national security concerns. India’s IT Ministry said it had “credible information” the latest batch were acting against India’s interests. Other apps affected include search giant Baidu’s app and Sina News. The ministry said it had…

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Lifestyle

Personal greatness more loved than team dominance

September 2, 2020 People enjoy witnessing extraordinary individuals – from athletes to CEOs – extend long runs of dominance in their fields, but they aren’t as interested in seeing similar streaks of success by teams or groups, a new study suggests. “Everyone wants Usain Bolt to win another gold medal for sprinting. Not so many people want to see the New England Patriots win another Super Bowl,” said lead author Jesse Walker, M.A. ‘17, Ph.D. ‘19, now an assistant professor of marketing at Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business.…

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