World

The Moon: NASA's Findings

Inconsistent and contradictory information concerning the recalculated neutral point leads some investigators to believe NASA is conducting an official cover-up. Using NASA's own figures, researchers have determined that the flight times for the Apollo missions were shorter than they should have been, indicating that the spacecraft began to accelerate sooner than they would have if the moon's gravity were only one-sixth that of Earth's. The figures, in fact, validate the claim that the moon's gravity is nearly the same as Earth's! Assuming the moon's gravity is one-sixth that of Earth's,…

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World

The Moon: The Lunar Surface

Early Apollo missions found no traces of water on the lunar surface. But NASA scientists were stunned later when they detected a water vapor cloud greater than 100 square miles in size. This water vapor appears to have come from inside the moon, according to NASA testimony. Clouds, fog and other surface changes have been observed on the lunar surface for centuries. Six different 19th century astronomers reported having observed a fog which obscured details in the floor of the crater Plato. This would seem to contradict the idea that…

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World

The Moon: What Is This Strange Thing Orbiting Earth?

Three theories have been postulated to explain the moon, none of them really worth their salt. The first is that the moon was created from the same cosmic dust cloud at the same time as Earth about 4.6 billion years ago. The second is that the moon was torn from the Pacific Basin which later filled with water. The third, generally accepted by most scientists, is that the moon was captured by the Earth as it wandered into our gravitational field. The mechanics involved in such a celestial capture are…

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World

Researchers look to gut microbiome to improve bone health

A Cornell-led collaboration has been awarded a five-year, $3.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to explore the ways that the gut microbiome – that mass of microorganisms inside us all – impacts bone quality. Their findings could potentially lead to the creation of a microbiome-based therapeutic for improving bone health. The Cornell team is led by principal investigator Christopher J. Hernandez, professor in the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, in collaboration with researchers at Tufts University and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Hernandez came to the gut microbiome…

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World

Study tracks food’s value from farm to plate globally

June 7, 2021 | Tom Fleischman As soon as an ear of corn is taken off its stalk, or a potato is pulled from the ground, it travels anywhere from a few miles to across continents, and sometimes undergoes a multitude of processes that transform it into the food we consume. These miles and processes all contribute to what’s known as the food value chain (FVC), along which, as one might expect, the value of the product increases. However, most of the research and attention thus far paid to FVCs…

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Tech

Researchers Discover Clue to How to Protect Neurons and Encourage Their Growth

By inhibiting a particular family of enzymes, it may be possible to develop new therapies for treating neurodegenerative diseases from glaucoma to Alzheimer’s December 14, 2020 | By Scott LaFee Many neurodegenerative conditions, from glaucoma to Alzheimer’s disease, are characterized by injury to axons — the long, slender projections that conduct electrical impulses from one nerve cell to another, facilitating cellular communications. Injury to axons often leads to neuronal impairment and cell death. Researchers know that inhibiting an enzyme called dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) appears to robustly protect neurons…

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Tech

Physics professor advances research on black hole paradox

By Kate Blackwood |December 9, 2020  Do black holes emit information? For decades, physicists have theorized on this high-stakes question. At the heart of the so-called “black hole information paradox” is a fundamental incompatibility between the two pillar theories of theoretical physics: general relativity and quantum mechanics. But in the past two years, a series of breakthrough calculations by researchers – including Tom Hartman, associate professor of physics in the College of Arts and Sciences – have led to proclamations in the field of theoretical physics that “the most famous…

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Neurons Stripped of Their Identity Are Hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease, Study Finds

November 13, 2020 | By Liezel Labios Researchers at the University of California San Diego have identified new mechanisms in neurons that cause Alzheimer’s disease. In particular, they discovered that changes in the structure of chromatin, the tightly coiled form of DNA, trigger neurons to lose their specialized function and revert to an earlier cell state. This results in the loss of synaptic connections, an effect associated with memory loss and dementia. The findings are published Nov. 13 in Science Advances. The study was founded on the question: how do…

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Fossil footprints tell story of prehistoric parent’s journey

Hungry giant predators, treacherous mud and a tired, probably cranky toddler – more than 10,000 years ago, that was the stuff of every parent’s nightmare. Footprints found at White Sands National Park in New Mexico, from more than 11,000 years ago, of an adult carrying a child for nearly a mile, then returning along the same path without the child. Evidence of that type of frightening trek was recently uncovered, and at nearly a mile it is the longest known trackway of early-human footprints ever found. The discovery, published in…

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Tech

Klarman fellow models black hole collisions, studies effects

By Kate Blackwood |October 13, 2020 -  New and extremely sensitive instruments are allowing scientists to use a novel source of information – gravitational waves – to understand fundamental principles of nature. “Gravitational waves are the signals that carry information about gravity,” said Vijay Varma, a Klarman Postdoctoral Fellow in physics, in the College of Arts and Sciences. “If two black holes are orbiting each other, for example, gravitational waves carry information about the masses and spins of the black holes and how the black holes may have formed.” Varma…

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